Elisabeth Arzt

Elisabeth Arzt

Elisabeth Arzt

ELISABETH ARZT, jewelry
2017/18 Artist in Residence


My body of work strives to emphasize the human-arboreal interrelationship. Trees have been an inherent factor in our survival as a species, and, in turn, are an integral part of humanity's culture. They are the ultimate matriarch, they protect us with shelter, they keep us in motion by providing fuel and fire, and nourish our bodies with medicine and food. Due to their essentiality, their presence is implicit in our civilization: references to trees live in our language, mythos, and provide a leeway to a higher understanding beyond our existence; just like the Buddha under bodhi tree or Sir Isaac Newton under the apple tree.

As Nancy Newhall famously said, “The wilderness holds answers to questions man has not yet learned to ask.” For Thoreau it provided inspiration and solace; for John Muir it was a healing ritual; for humanity, the outdoors brings us back to our roots, it grounds us. For me, the wilds allows me to take a step back and recognize what we are missing and have lost in our everyday lives. Just as certain stones are charged on amulets, talismans, and other jewelry, my desire is to empower the wearer with different types of woods and integrate the two materials onto a piece. While at Mendocino, I will continue the marriage of woodworking and metalsmithing and, in turn, produce objects that provide the wearer inspiration to seek greater wisdom in nature and to bestow empowerment within themselves.


ABOUT ELISABETH
Elisabeth Arzt received her BFA in Sculpture at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington D.C. Upon graduating, she moved to New York City where she worked in theater and television industry. After a few years in the industry, Elisabeth was introduced to the art of chainsaw carving and she has now been carving for the past 5 years. Her carvings can be found all throughout the country. In the mean time Elisabeth has been developing her metalsmithing skills and incorporating her woodworking skills and silversmithing. At Mendocino Art Center, she will be developing a jewelry line with the intention of integrating wood, stones, and silver to reveal how a tree's rings to the ring on your finger can be laden with so many stories.


Visit Elisabeth Arzt's website